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UPUI-flRD an 



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UPWARD and 

Official 194% i/emlmak 

4 

STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE 



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J\j<viik Adorns, MaMaokadetU 



"When thus I hail the Moment flying: 
'Ah, still delay — thou art so fair!' 
Then bind me in thy bonds undying, 
My final ruin then declare!" 

— Goethe's Faust 



DEDICATION 



We, the class of 1948, dedicate this yearbook, 
as we dedicate ourselves, to the new generation. 



PRESIDENT'S 0IESSH6E 



TO THE CLASS OF 1948: 

TZOU entered college when the great war was about to end in victory. Peace 
A came and with it the short years of readjustment. You are leaving when the 
issues of war or peace are again unsettled and when the purposes for which we 
fought are again in jeopardy. Whether there be war or peace, our country needs 
men and women who can teach. Our civilization can not survive unless all 
peoples learn from teachers with knowledge and wisdom and the courage of 
high convictions, and with a faith that the issues of life are in the mind and spirit 
and not in the power derived from possession of material things. 

May your lives be rich in the happiness which is the possession of those who 
wisely learn and teach. 




MR. BOWMAN 



yfflRBOOK STAFF 



Editor-in-Chief — Rolland W. Jones 



Treasurer 
Leo Vigneault 



Business Manager 
Frederick Ellis 



Faculty Adviser 
Cora M. Vining 



Senior Staff: Theodore T. Toporowski, Janice D. Gleason, E. Mae Black, Marjorie 
M. Cleary, Marilyn A. Eastman, Albena C. Waidlich 

Junior Staff: Alice J. Bosma, Phyllis Andrews, Arthur E. Bartlett, Elizabeth J. 
Grande, Roland A. P. Gagnier, Paul A. Klein, Jr., Marie V. Lamarre 

Sophomore Staff: Walter C. Richardson, Stephen A. Boisvert, Jr., Joy R. Dorfman, 
Leonard Rondeau, Genevieve A. Pelc, Shirley Newell 

Freshman Staff: Chester T. Pawlowski, Eileen A. Bates, Withold V. Kirmil, 
Ruth Murray, Spero Pappas, Patricia J. Prendergast 



COLLEGE and H HOPS fflCULiy 



Grover C. Bowman, A.B., A.M., Ed.D., 
President 

Claire C. Barry, Sc.B. in Ed., Ed.M. 

Lillian E. Boyden, Sc.B. in Ed., A.M. 

Harry S. Broudy, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Viola Cooper 

Martha E. Durnin, Sc.B. in Ed., A.M. 

Andrew S. Flagg, Sc.B. in Ed. 

Kalervo Kansanniva, Sc.B. in Ed., Ed.M. 

Loretta J. Loftus, Sc.B. in Ed. 

Edmund K. Luddy, A.B., A.M. 

Helen E. Mallery, Sc.B., in Ed. 

William H. Malone, Sc.B., Ed.M. 

Hazel B. Mileham, Sc.B., A.M., Ph.D. 

Helen M. Newell, Sc.B. in Ed., Ed.M. 

Mary Underbill, A.B., A.M., Ed.M. 

Wallace H. Venable, Sc.B., A.M. 

Cora M. Vining, Sc.B. in Ed., A.M., Sc.B. 
(Library Science) 

Beth A. Weston, Sc.B. in Ed., Ed.M. 

OFFICE STAFF 
Bertha L. Allyn 
Virginia Morrissey 

DORMITORY MATRON 
Lena Odell 



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flUFUJI€D£RS€H€n 



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MISS ELIZABETH M. JENKINS 

In September, 1924, Miss Jenkins began her work 
here as Head of the Extension Department. Soon 
after that she became Supervisor of Rural Education. 
Her next duty was that of Director of Methods. Her 
work brought her into a very close relationship with 
the entire college family, who loved and respected her. 
When she left in October, 1947, she was Dean of 
Women. 



MRS. DOROTHY HOGARTH BROUDY 

Mrs. Broudy came to us, in 1943, from the office 
of Hyannis State Teachers College. During her stay 
here she had been most kind and helpful to both the 
faculty and the students. She left in March, 1948. 



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TRIBUTC 




TO OUR CLASS ADVISER 

To our class, as to many others, Wallace H. Venable 
has been a wise counselor, a faithful teacher, and a true 
friend. Knowing him has been our good fortune. 



13 



S £ n 1 ft CLASS 




President 


Rolland W.Jones 


Vice-President 


Raymond Wilson 


Secretary 


Marilyn Eastman 


Treasurer 


Theodore Toporowski 



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ETHEL . MAE BLACK 

Class President 1 
Current Events Club 3, 4. 

Vice-President 4 
Glee Club 1, 2 
House Council 2 

Secretary 2 
Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 4 
Executive Board 4 
Yearbook Staff 4 



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MARJORIE MARIE CLEARY 

Choir 1, 2 

Glee Club 1, 2 

Newman Club 1, 2 

Red Cross College Unit 1, 2 

Vice-President 2 
Sports Award 

Numerals 2 

W. A. A. 3 
Taconic Columns 2 
Women's Athletic Association 1, 2, 3, 4 

Conference at Fitchburg 3 

Head of Sports 3 
Yearbook Staff 4 



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MARILYN ANNE EASTMAN 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

President 4 
W. A. A. 1, 2, 3, 4 

Secretary-Treasurer 3 
Class Secretary 3, 4 
President's List 2 
House Council 2, 3 

Vice-President 3 
Orchestra 1, 2 
Unit of Red Cross 3, 4 

Delegate to Red Cross Conference 3 
Taconic Columns 3 
Yearbook Staff 4 



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JANICE DELLA GLEASON 

Current Events Club 1, 2 

Secretary 2 
Delegate to ESAPST Conference in N. Y. 2, 3 
Frank Fuller Murdock Honor Society 2, 3, 4 

Secretary 3, 4 
Glee Club 1 

President's List 1, 2, 3, 4 
Student Council 2, 3 

Secretary 2 

President 3 
Taconic Columns 2, 3 

Circulation Manager 2 

Reporter 3 
Women's Athletic Association 2 
Who's Who Among Students 3 
Yearbook Staff 4 



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CORNELIUS FRANCIS HARRINGTON 

Current Events 1 

Editor-in-Chief Taconic Columns 2 

Manager Co-operative Book Store 2, 3, 4 

President Student Council 4. 

Drama Club 2 

The Physician in Spite of Himself 

by Moliere 2 



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ROLLAND WALTER JONES 

Class President 3, 4 

Class Treasurer 1 

Current Events Club 1 

Delegate to the NETPA Conference in Boston 4 

Drama Club 1, 2 

Geronte in The Physician in Spite of Him- 
self by Moliere 2 
Ensemble 1, 2 

Narrator for Christmas Pageant 1, 2, 3, 4 
President's List 1, 3 
President of Art Club 1, 2 
Student Council 3, 4 
Taconic Columns 

Editorials 2 

Editor-in-Chief 3 

Editorial Board 4 
Yearbook 

Assistant Editor-in-Chief 3 

Editor-in-Chief 4 



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THEODORE THOMAS TOPOROWSKI 

Art Club 1, 2 

Vice-President 1, 2 
Class President 2 
Class Treasurer 4 
Class Vice-president 1 
Current Events Club 1, 2 
Frank Fuller Murdock Honor Society 2, 3, 4 

President 4 
Newman Club 1, 2 
President's List 1, 2, 3, 4 
Student Council 

Vice-president 2 
Tacotiic Columns 2,5,4 

Author of winning name for this publication 

Managing Editor 3 

Honor Society Reporter 3, 4 
Yearbook Staff 4 



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JOSEPH A. VIVORI 

Current Events Club 1, 2, 4 
Art Club 2, 3 

President 3 
Newman Club 2, 3, 4 
Men's Athletic Association 3, 4 



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ALBENA CAROLYN WAIDLICH 

Class Secretary 2 

Class Vice-president 3 

Current Events Club 2, 3, 4 

Delegate to ESAPST Conference in N. Y. 4 

Glee Club 1 

Frank Fuller Murdock Honor Society 2, 3, 4 

House President 4 

Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

President's List 1, 2, 3. 4 

Student Council 4 

Women's Athletic Association 1, 2 

Yearbook Staff 3, 4 



2 3 




RAYMOND W. WILSON 

Class Vice-President 4 
Current Events Club 3, 4 



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"TUB) ALSO fiflO" 



Allen, Barbara J. 
Atwood, Margaret D. 
Begiebing, Eleanor J. 
Chenail, Albert H. 
Cheney, Barbara E. 
Colbert, Anne E. 
Durkee, Marion T. 
Elkin, Lillian 
Harris, Viola I. 
Higley, Marcia 
Kronick, Sonya I. 
• Marlowe, Doris E. 
Maxwell, Claire 
Montgomery, Dorcas A. 
Murtha, Beatrice A. 
Neyland, Margaret E. 
Packard, Shirley H. 
Ross, Agnes C. 
Tremblay, Marie V. 
Wylde, Aline M. 



25 



SEMOR CAP and GOHJI1 DM SPEECH 



TATE, the graduating class of '48, with the hesitation of the untried, accept 
these academic caps and gowns as symbols of the four years we have spent 
here in preparation for teaching. We accept them, also, as symbolic of our whole- 
hearted willingness to teach. But we cannot, yet, accept them as symbols of our 
teaching ability. The new generation will serve as either proud or poor testimony 
to our teaching ability. The new generation will be much more accurate a judge 
than anything that could be summoned here to judge us today. 

Those who take an interest in our college always hold out the hope that the 
members of each graduating class will turn out to be thinking-doers. We cannot 
assure you of that dream but we can, with much certainty, assure you that the 
principles and methods to which we have been conditioned here will be govern- 
ing factors in most of the responses that we shall make to the stimuli of life. 

With trust in the system that has been our master in our bachelor days and with 

faith in the ideals that carry us upward and on, we hope to be, not only, thinking 

educated people, but also, active educators. 

Rolland W. Jones 



11 



SfOIOR CLASS HISTORy 



KARL MARX saw history in terms of a class struggle. We might reword his 
comment to rather accurately describe ourselves; our class history has also 
been that of a struggle. Nor is the writing of our chronicle an easy matter. Four 
years of "rich and varied, shared experience" are not quickly condensed into a 
short essay by one member of the class. 

The task of noting the incidents and slogans that are part of our college life 
without becoming so clannish that others won't know what we are talking about 
is rather difficult. Bosnia-Herzego-vina, "Verweile dock! Du bist so schon", the 
solid citizen, the shovel philosophy, "Be brave, begin" — These are all bywords with 
us because they symbolize experiences we have had together just as the same kind 
of words do for any group of friends. But to the uninitiated, they are "insig- 
nificant speech" — to use another quote the Seniors like. 

If an impressionistic write-up of our memories won't do for the yearbook, shall 
we try to be witty and factual at the same time? Something like: 

"Our junior year found us in the Training School trying to discover 
the elusive distinctions between appreciations and understandings and 
repeating Dewey's two criteria — quickly, now, what are they?" 

It can be seen that this sort of thing has been done too often to be particularly 
original with us. 

Shall we then attempt a little satire on progressive philosophers' pedaguese? 
Taking a paragraph from Mursell, we could remark that our college careers have 
been "vital learning experiences in which we dynamically and strongly interacted" 
and which have engaged "our interest, will, and active purpose." 



28 



This gives a rather one-sided picture of our development, however. We would 
not want you to think of us as intellectuals who are socially immature. Well, to 
show that we are integrated, we could list the many extracurricular activities and 
social events we have sponsored. Besides our boast of "Miss Ballerina", consider 
our participation in the Current Events club, "The Doctor in Spite of Himself", 
Honor Society, Glee Club, Taconic Columns, Who's Who, House and Student 
Council, New York Conferences, lectures, proms, socials, dinners. But the 
reader can see these statistics beneath our class pictures. 

Perhaps, philosophers that we are, we should show how our search for the 
absolutes has resulted in a well-arranged value scheme or that family life can be 
beautiful, even if Plato didn't think so. 

There is one more serious approach we might adopt. During the academic 
years 1944-1948 there occurred events of world importance which we have 
observed together. When we have forgotten, perhaps, just what our slogans and 
watchwords meant, we shall still recall that Franklin Roosevelt died when we 
were in college, that the Marines raised a flag on Suribachi, and that we left the 
campus one spring noontime to see VE-Day celebrated. We were at STC when 
modern man became obsolete, when Ghandi was assassinated, when Europe 
starved, and when a third war threatened. We realize that there is much to be 
done in the world, and that we as educators have a formidable challenge to meet. 

All these things come to our minds as we think of our class history. For us, 
they evoke images of four years together — not always serene, not always satisfied, 
but things we shall remember with a smile when textbooks are forgotten and we 
are alumni to some other young and fortunate senior class. Underclassmen, 
will you remember us? 

Janice Gleason — Historian 



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CLASS WILL 



We 

the class of 1948 

leave to everyone 

the sincere wish 

that each 

may find 

the happiness 

that he seeks. 



CLASS PROPHCCy 



There are no Cassandras or Laocoons in the class of 1948. 



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TRIBUTE 




TO OUR CLASS ADVISER 

t T l HE class of '49 extends its sincere gratitude 
and appreciation to Mr. Luddy, its class ad- 
viser, for his wise guidance and deep under- 
standing. 



31 



JUNIOR CLASS 




President — Alice Bosma 
Secretary Treasurer 

Pearl Landstrom Elizabeth Grande 



32 



CLASS HISTORy 



HERE we are back in '47 — the same class — a new year — and one man lost. 
Yes, he and our class president took the fatal step, giving the Juniors their 
first married couple. 

We walked in — looked at our schedule — and grinned from ear to ear! 
Three subjects! ! ! Two minutes later our grins descended to our toes — Methods 
courses had to be added; nine more hours chalked up against us. So began our 
hourly tramp across the grass to the training school; that is, until Dr. Mileham 
pointed out the use of the driveway. 

We trained for weeks ! ! 



One and one makes two, Jimmy please sit down, 
Doris pass your paper in, Our heads spun round 

and round. 
Our progress might have been quite slow, 
But we traveled many miles. 
And though you heard us griping, 
We did have frequent smiles. 

In October we were saddened by Miss Jenkins' resignation, but Miss Durnin's 
presence soon spurred us on to further gain. 

First semester departed and the blue books came marching by — trampling the 
Juniors on their way. One Junior withstood the bombardment with enough 
stamina to make the honor list. The rest of us withstood them with enough 
stamina to remain in school. 

With no childish faces before us, we entered second semester with mountains 
of work to overcome. It's a good thing the Juniors have a strong constitution. 

Soon after second semester began, we lost our president and were forced to 
rely on the abilities of our vice-president. We miss Faith and wish her lots of 
luck in her new venture. 

Did you notice the worried look on the Juniors' faces in March, the various 
meetings, the whispered planning? No wonder! They were getting ready to 
hold the Junior-Senior prom. No need for worry; the affair gave the Seniors a 
grand send-off to a new and successful career. 

The home stretch is in shooting distance. Eagerly we await the September 
starting gun to race down the last mile together. 



33 



CLASS WILL 



WE, the Juniors of '48 
With no intent to intimidate, 
Bequeath and bequest to the Sophomore Class 
"Desirable outcomes" and how to pass. 
Not that we think you won't know how, 
But we are more experienced than thou! 
And so we stress a "double rule", 
The second being the Training School. 
It will notably contrast your former beat, 
But teachers are kind and children sweet, 
And the only thing you have to do 
Is rack your brain to please the two. 
It's really a program exempt from toil, 
Preparations grow clear with the midnight oil. 
Remember: examples from you shall come, 
So don't teach a lesson while chewing gum. 
You'll find little memory work at all, 
Just Burton, Dewey, G. Stanley Hall, 
O'er theory you can gain full sway 
In any spare twelve hours a day. 
So carry on with this your lot, 
More "context" would reveal the plot. 
All this we give and vouch it can 
Be used for any lesson plan. 









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CLASS PROPHECy 



GOOD DAY, Ladies and Gentlemen, this is yours truly, once again bringing to 
you a fragment of forgotten drama. Today, as we lift that thin veil of destiny 
that hides men and women, we see a group of teachers working: some in a little 
red school house; some, principals; some, teaching in high schools; and some 
pursuing that wonderful profession of motherhood. Turning back the pages of 
time we come to a scene in a small community where a group of students are seen 
trudging into a yellow building. First was the difficult task of meeting each other 
and getting adjusted to one another. Friendships were born, pal aiding pal in 
exams. The next year saw these friendships cementing. A few students left for 
other jobs. The third year found another school, Mark Hopkins, being added. 
People laughed, kidded, envied, and respected these groups of students who were 
showing the world that they could make good; undaunted this group carried on. 
At last it came: the year of 1949 

Now, before the conclusion of our story, a word from one of the group: "We 
have shown a world, torn by strife, that the torch of freedom still burns. It is 
through the youth of America that we can make Democracy a living institution 
so that regardless of what others may say, democracy can and will survive. We 
will teach our children and our children's children that even though they dis- 
agree with others they must respect the opinions of others, thus insuring a living 
form of government, and showing the world that a democracy is the best form of 
government for America." 

Now, back to our story: 1949 saw this courageous group completing their 
training and receiving their degrees. Some went on to become famous; others 
received no notice but each went forth with the feeling that this country is a mighty 
fine place to live. This is yours truly, drawing together that thin veil of destiny 
and, until next time, saying good day. 



35 



TRIBUTE 




TO OUR CLASS ADVISER 



Many are the rough roads that Dr. Broudy has 
smoothed for us; many, the high mountains he 
has lifted us over; many, the heavy hearts he has 
lightened. 



37 



SOPHOMf CLASS 




President — Walter Richardson 



Vice-President 
William Minardi 



Secretary 
Daniel Connors 



38 



CLASS HISTOfiy 



FEWER in number but just as strong in spirit, we worldlywise sophomores 
returned once more to S.T.C. We started off right by taking Greylock in our 
stride. Then before we were back long, a catastrophe befell the girls of our 
class. Four of our men were taken off the eligible list. Leap year, is it? Al- 
though we had quite a struggle with some of our new subjects such as Psychology, 
Global and Economic Geography, and Government, we enjoyed seeing hidden 
"talents" creep out in our Art and Speech courses. The Sadie Hawkins Dance 
again went off with a "bang", and the success of our Sophomore Prom was due 
to the willing cooperation of the members of our class. We also made a good 
showing in the Drama Club production, "Kind Lady"; eight out of the thirteen 
members of the cast were Sophomores. Among us, too, are a few athletes who 
show up on the basketball floor. 

Somehow we have managed to survive the 3-hour exams and the annual 
sophomore tests and have now reached the half-way mark. Two whole years 
packed with memories lie behind us, and two years, uncertain, unknown, lie 
ahead. But we are looking forward to the time when we will be known as the 
"jolly, jolly Juniors" and no longer as "silly Sophomores." 



39 



CLASS Of 1950 WILL and TESTftdlUlT 



We, the class of 1950, will the following: 

To the class of 1951: 

A president with the capability of Walt Richardson 

A class adviser as competent, understanding, and cooperative, as 

Dr. Broudy. 
Business managers as efficient as Dan Connors, Paul Dube and Walt 

Richardson. 
None of the difficulties and all of the fun. 

To the faculty: 

Future students with the virtues of: 

Dr. Bowman (Cooperation) 

Mr. Flagg, Dean of Men (Men) 

Miss Weston, Dean of Women (Women) 

Miss Underhill (Attention) 

Miss Boyden (Enthusiasm) 

Dr. Broudy (Sobriety) 

Mr. Luddy (Promptness) 

Mr. Venable (Insight) 

Mr. Malone (Pep) 

Miss Durnin (Abstraction) 

Miss Vining (Silence) 

Mr. Kansanniva (Elocution) 

To the office staff: 
Gratitude 

To the Janitors: 
Neatness 

To the training school: 
Charity 



40 



To the basketball team: 

The expert eye of Bill Minardi 

The ball handling of Lou Parisien 

The capability of managers Lou Ciolkowski and Paul Dube 

To Taconic Columns: 

The editorship of Joy Dorfman 

Sports coverage of Bob Dean and Jim Dougherty 

To the Drama Club: 

The acting ability of Joe Joseph and Roberta Brandt 

To the Glee Club: 

The voices of Joe Rosi, Marcia Cate, and Cathy Burrington 

To Posterity: 

From the men: 

The dressing ability of Ed. Quirk 

The ties of Walt Richardson 

The new look of Rog Prince 

The wit of Bill Rokowski 

The good nature of Lou Parisien 

The popularity of Bill Minardi 

The build o.f Len Rondeau 

The intelligence of Dick Desjarlais 

The spirit of the Old Guard 

From the women: 

The legs of Marcia Cate 

The figure and eyes of Eunice Beaudin 

The hair of Cathy Burrington 

The wit of Joy Dorfman 

The good nature of Jane Griffin 

The dressing ability of Totsy Burdick 

The new look of Dot Del Debbio 

The intelligence of Jinny Knight 



41 



TRIBUTE 





TO OUR CLASS ADVISERS 

THE CLASS of '51 has been most fortunate in receiving the splendid coopera- 
tion of two of the most helpful members of the faculty: Mr. Flagg, dean of 
men, and Miss Weston, dean of women, who has most capably succeeded Miss 
Jenkins. These two professors have been the inspiration needed to stimulate 
the activities and ambitions of the freshman class. Their fine assistance and 
guidance have certainly been great factors in effecting the success of various social 
events. Their untiring efforts will always be remembered by the entire student 
body. The Class of '51 has not only realized the significance of college social 
gatherings, but has refurbished their conception of cooperation to include true 
benevolence. 

More power to you, Miss Weston and Mr. Flagg! The students need you and 
most certainly appreciate your excellent support. 



42 



FR£SHmnn class 




President 


Vice President 


Chester Pawlowski 


James Glavin 


Secretary 


Treasurer 


Kathleen Coty 


Shirley Tillbrook 



43 



FfiESHfTlfln CLASS HISTORy 



ON A clear, cool, crisp Monday morning, the fifteenth of September, to be 
exact, eighty-four eager and ambitious freshmen climbed the Church Street 
Hill to enter STC. A variety of people coming from all parts of the state compris- 
ed the student body. Some fresh from high school, some fresh from the service, 
some fresh. . . . 

We owe a debt of gratitude to the Student Council, which sponsored the 
Freshman Reception to enable us to become better acquainted with our fellow 
students. 

According to tradition, we also made the annual expedition to Greylock. 
Need we say more? We had the usual ailments that accompany this memorable 
trip: aches, pains, and blisters. 

Now as we were an organization, we had to function as one; therefore we 
required class officers. After a lively and hotly contested campaign, the follow- 
ing officers were selected: president, Chet Pawlowski; vice-president, Jim Glavin; 
treasurer, Shirley Tillbrook; secretary, Kathleen Coty. 

The freshman class played host to the rest of the student body at the Freshman 
Hop. This will long be remembered by the entire college as one of the most 
successful social undertakings of the year. 

Following our Christmas vacation, we returned to school and found ourselves 
confronted by term papers and finals. After successfully completing these two 
hurdles we classified ourselves as true college veterans, realizing that school was 
not all play. 

When we returned for the second semester, prepared to resume our studies, 
we found that some new members had joined our ranks. They were made to 
feel at home and participated with the rest in the numerous social events which 
the second semester held. The Saint Patrick's Day Party, the Mardi Gras, and 
the Junior-Senior Prom are but a few of the affairs that will serve as milestones in 
our collegiate lives. 

With the Easter vacation, term papers, and final exams, our freshman year 
terminated; but with it many friendships were made, and the social events that 
took place that will be cherished by all of us in years to come. 



44 



fRESMn CLASS WILL 



WE, the Class of '51 
Who've shared a year of work and fun, 
Do hereby leave the coming students 
An air of nonchalance and prudence. 

To the incoming freshmen we gladly leave 
The will to pursue and to achieve, 
The goal of perfection so easily missed 
Only gained by those who persist. 

If in trouble or in doubt, 

Just ask the one you see about 

The halls of NASTC. 

Your answer will be, "Follow me". 

Now that we've shown you what to gain 
From serious thought we will refrain. 
Through mistakes we've come to know 
What is right and what won't go. 

So they may still keep fit and trim 
We'll leave the fellows our spacious gym. 
To the gals we'll leave our chorus 
Just to prove it didn't bore us. 

Cutting classes with gay abandon. 
My, the trouble you can land in! 
Though this advice is given dearly, 
What is given is given sincerely. 



45 



CLASS PfiOPHfCy 



HE WHO dares prophecy the future must inevitably reckon with the past. 
Formidable scholastic obstacles have been encountered and overcome with 
varying degrees of success. A veritable tidal aftermath of grim, psychological 
proportions has literally inundated the senses of normal-minded sheep-skin 
aspirants; so much so, that these well-meaning souls have, in the process of critical 
analysis, been forced to delve into serious introspection, circumspection, retro- 
spection, "solar spectrums" and Lucretius' "Of The Nature of Things" for possible 
clues of cause and effect. . . . 

. . .We prophecy that the school term, 1948-1949, will see the formation of a 
unique academic association for the advancement of freshman class averages. 
It is believed that such a plan might foster all of those sterling qualities in students 
which the faculty deem scholarly attributes. The birth of such an organization 
might prove to be the general panacea and the specific "elixir" by which the be- 
labored freshmen would be relieved from academic oppression and anxiety and 
secure a normal "nitrogen-balance." It will be a medium wherein intellectual 
grievances and woes immedicable will dissolve as spring snows to give percepti- 
ble rise to a fresh, heart-lifting, educational outlook. 

The well-deliberated scheme, then, is the formation of a "1.5 club" calculated 
to raise to a "common standard" and reduce to a common denominator all ac- 
ademic achievement and thus, with one bold sweep, to remove forever the bane of 
"scholastic autocracy." (Eligibility is limited only to the candidate's acquisition 
of liberal marks, in any subject, not exceeding that after which the club is named.) 
This newly found "1.5 proletariat" (whiih should comprise a substantial pro- 
portion of the student body) will, in this invigorating "tension-free" atmosphere, 
be able to assume their collegiate duties without the constant spectre of the sword 
of Damocles hanging o'er their heads. A period of enlightenment must assuredly 
ensue, granting grace and courage to disillusioned students. 

And, — anon, — the light shone through, — " 'Twas but a dream," I said to 
myself; or perhaps a touch of spring had worked its magic upon my fancy. The 
prophecy had faded from view but we who have caught wisps of its trailing vapors 
may find in the revelation some measure of wise comfort. 



46 



ORGflfllZflTIOIlS 



ALUMNI 

President — Mrs. Dolores Toporowski 

Vice-President — Stanley Gradziel 
Secretary — Mrs. Alphonsus Merrigan 

COMMUTERS COUNCIL 

President — Mary O'Brien 
Vice-President — Eunice Beaudin 
Secretary-Treasurer — Marie Lamarre 
Patrol Leader — Elizabeth Grande 

CURRENT EVENTS CLUB 

President — Arthur Bartlett 
Vice-President — Mae Black 

DORMITORY COUNCIL 

President — Albena Waidlich 
Vice-President — Joy Dorfman 
Secretary-Treasurer — Shirley Newell 

DRAMA CLUB AND RADIO GUILD 

President — Stephen Boisvert, Jr. 
Vice-President — Carol Malloy 
Secretary-Treasurer — Daniel Connors 

FRANK FULLER MURDOCK HONOR SOCIETY 

President — Theodore Toporowski 
Vice-President — Alice Bosma 
Secretary — Janice Gleason 



48 



GLEE CLUB 

President — Marilyn Eastman 

Vice-President — Richard Desjarlais 

Secretary-Treasurer — Catherine Burrington 

MEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

President — Stephen Boisvert, Jr. 
Vice-President — Robert Dean 
Secretary — -James Dougherty, Jr. 
Treasurer — William F. Rokowski 

NEWMAN CLUB 

President — Theresa Connors 
Vice-President — William Minardi 
Secretary — Mary O'Brien 

RED CROSS UNIT 

Chairman — Phyliss Andrews 
Secretary-Treasurer — Pearl Landstrom 

STUDENT COUNCIL 

President — Neil Harrington 

Central Treasurer — Arthur Bartlett 

Secretary — Marie Lamarre 

TACONIC COLUMNS 

Editor — Joy Dorfman 

WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

President — Alice Bosma 

Vice-President — Shirley Newell 

Secretary — Catherine Burrington 



49 



SOCIAL CflLEflDOR 



October 


9 


October 


17 


October 


24 


October 


31 


November 


14 


November 


21 


December 


4 


December 


14 


December 


18 


January 


16 


March 


11 


March 


12 


March 


19 


April 


30 


May 


10 


May 


15 


May 


19 


May 


29 


May 


30 


Tune 


2 



Mountain Day 

W.A.A. Conference Week-end. "The Mad Hatters" — Presented 
by the Drama Club. 

Sadie Hawkins' Day Dance — Sponsored by the Sophomore Class. 
Visit to the Freedom Train in Pittsfield — Sponsored by the 

Current Events Club. 
Freshman Hop. 
Thanksgiving Formal — Sponsored by the Sophomore Class. 

Walter Pritchard Eaton — Presented by Frank Fuller Murdock 
Honor Society. 

Christmas Pageant. 

Christmas Buffet and Party. 

"The Kind Lady" — Presented by the Drama Club. 

Royal Theatre Repertory Company presents "A Midsummer 
Night's Dream" and "The Taming of the Shrew" — Sponsored 
by the Drama Club. 

St. Patrick's Day Party — Sponsored by the Newman Club. 

Mardi Gras — Sponsored by the W.A.A. 

Cap and Gown Day. 

Glee Club Concert. 

High School Play Day — Sponsored by the W.A.A. 

May Queen's Festival. 

Junior-Senior Prom. 

Baccalaureate 

Commencement 



50 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 



December 


3 


December 


5 


December 


10 


December 


12 


December 


17 


January 


6 


January 


7 


January 


9 


January 


14 


January 


16 


January 


29 


January 


30 


January 


31 


February 


4 


February 


10 


February 


11 


February 


18 


February 


20 


February 


21 


February 


28 


March 


5 


March 


6 



Men's Athletic Association 

Keene Teachers College at Home 
Albany Teachers College at Albany 
Westfield Teachers College at Home 
Albany College of Pharmacy at Albany 
Albany College of Pharmacy at Home 
Siena College at Loudonville 
Plattsburgh Teachers College at Home 
Westfield Teachers College at Westfield 
Plymouth Teachers College at Home 
Stockbridge Agricultural College at Stockbridge 
Champlain College at Plattsburgh 
Plattsburgh Teachers College at Plattsburgh 
Plymouth Teachers College at Plymouth 
Albany Business College at Home 
Keene Teachers College at Keene 
Cobbleskill Agricultural College at Home 
Siena College at Home 
Albany .Business College at Albany 
Cobbleskill Agricultural College at Cobbleskill 
Oneonta Teachers College at Oneonta 
Albany Teachers College at Home 
Oneonta Teachers College at Home 

Won 11 — Lost 11 



We 


They 


42 


33 


40 


68 


42 


31 


44 


61 


28 


22 


29 


64 


44 


36 


43 


27 


37 


47 


44 


43 


34 


55 


41 


42 


49 


55 


46 


34 


34 


72 


51 


50 


27 


51 


47 


42 


36 


39 


63 


47 


45 


49 


50 


43 



Women's Athletic Association 

February 27 Pittsfield Girls' League at Pittsfield 
March 3 Pittsfield Girls' League at Home 



19 

24 



50 
40 



51 



flUTOGRflPHS 



SflllORS 



Black, Ethel Mae 
Cleary, Marjorie M. 
Eastman, Marilyn A. 
Gleason, Janice D. 
Harrington, Cornelius F. 
Jones, Rolland W. 
Toporowski, Theodore T. 
Vivori, Joseph A. 
Waidlich, Albena C. 
Wilson, Raymond, W., Jr. 

Chapman, Ruth P. 

Adams, Martha L. 
Burgess, Robert D. 
Klein, F. Mildred 
Pierce, Robert J. 
Welch, Thomas R. 



33 Shattuck Street 
133 Franklin Street 
32 3 Silver Street 
R.F.D. No. 1 
29 High Street 
Hancock Road 
Wells Road 
5 5 Ivory Street 
58 Mineral Road 

GRADUATE 

74 Chestnut Street 

SPECIALS 
State Road 
24 Notch Road 
2 3 Kent Avenue 
145 Marion Avenue 
595 East Main Street 



Greenfield 

North Adams 

Greenfield 

North Adams 

North Adams 

So. Williamstown, R.F.D. 

Cheshire 

North Adams 

Millers Falls 

Charlemont 

North Adams 

Great Barrington 
North Adams 
Pittsfield 
North Adams 
North Adams 



juniORS 



Andrews, Phyliss M. 
Bartlett, Arthur E. 
Bosma, Alice J. 
Connors, Teresa E. 
Gagnier, Roland A. P. 
Grande, Elizabeth J. 
Karrey, Frances C. 
Klein, Paul A., Jr. 
LaFogg, Merlys 
Lamarre, Marie V. 
Landstrom, Pearl 
Martin, Mary A. 
Molloy, Carol M. 
Nichols, James E. 
Peck, Gertrude C. 
Schlosstein, Ann 
Taskin, Helen 



101 East Main Street 
Brodie Mt. Farm 
140 Summer Street 
155 Pleasant Street 
Goodrich Street 
64 Charles Street 
Goodrich Street 
46 Fairview Avenue 
43 Liberty Street 

Housatonic Street 
16 Quincy Street 
254 Eagle Street 

East Main Street 

45 Washington Avenue 



Savoy 

North Adams 

Lanesboro 

Lee 

North Adams 

Stockbridge 

North Adams 

Stockbridge 

Westfield 

North Adams 

Heath 

Lenox 

North Adams 

North Adams 

Shelburne 

Warren 

North Adams 



54 



SOPHOfTlORES 



Beaudin, Eunice L. 
Boisvert, Stephen A., Jr. 
Brandt, Roberta A. 
Bringan, William 
Brown, Goodwin B. 
Burdick, Constance W. 
Burrington, Catherine A. 
Cate, Marcia M. 
Ciolkowski, Louis A. 
Connors, Daniel J. 
Dean, Robert J. 
Del Debbio, Dorothy L. 
Desjarlais, Richard E. 
Dickinson, M. Elaine 
Dolgoff, William 
Dorfman, Joy R. 
Dougherty, James J. 
Dube, Paul L. 
England, Normand J. 
Fallon, Barbara M. 
Gould, Marjorie A. 
Griffin, Jane A. 
Holmes, Sylvia J. 
Joseph, Joseph J. 
Kirby, Barbara A. 
Knechtel, Doris A. 
Knight, Virginia J. 
Komisar, B. Paul 
Lamoureux, Oscar J., Jr. 
Little, Arnold A. 
Lynch, Raymond F. 
Mailhot, Adelard N., Jr. 
Minardi, William R. 
Morgan, Jane A. 
Morrison, Jeannie S. 
Nagle, John W. 
Newell, Shirley 
O'Brien, Mary E. 
O'Hara, Jesse T. 
Parisien, Louis W. 
Pelc, Genevieve A. 
Prince, Roger A. 



2 5 Lincoln Street 
495 State Road 
16 Shaw Street 

43 Leonard Street 
7 2 Quincy Street 
159 Pleasant Street 

416 Church Street 
22 Albert Street 
224 Washington Street 
75 Cady Street 

22 5 State Street 

68 Ducharme Avenue 

North Street 

205 Houghton Street 

59 Georgia Street 

44 Cady Street 

49 Riverside Avenue 
112 Clark Street 

41 Holbrook Street 

902 Front Street 

128 Columbia Street 
196 Eagle Street 
71 No. Summer Street 
38 Balcomb Street 
578 Chicopee Street 
20 South Street 

23 Arnold Street 
106 Holden Street 
87 Barth Street 

42 Wales Street 
14 Thomas Street 
Cold Spring Road 
106 Pleasant Street 
104 Springfield Street 
82 Park Avenue 

P. O. Box 161 
1001 Union Street 

50 Grove Street 

60 Bradley Street 



North Adams 

North Adams 

North Weymouth 

North Adams 

North Adams 

North Adams 

Heath 

North Adams 

Adams 

Taunton 

North Adams 

North Adams 

Willimansett 

Whately 

North Adams 

Roxbury 

North Adams 

Quincy 

New Bedford 

North Adams 

Charlemont 

Chicopee Falls 

Sheffield 

Adams 

North Adams 

Adams 

Salem 

Willimansett 

Taunton 

Williamstown 

North Adams 

North Adams 

Taunton 

Williamstown 

Williamstown 

North Adams 

Wilbraham 

North Adams 

Canaan, Conn. 

North Adams 

Greenfield 

North Adams 



55 



Quirk, Edward P. 
Richardson, Walter C. 
Rokowski, William F. 
Rondeau, Leonard 
Rosi, Joseph A. 
Russell, James H., Jr. 
Siciliano, Mary Ann C. 
Vigneault, Leo P. 
Walsh, William N. 
Waterman, Howard E. 
Zaffino, Bruno 



26 Grove Street 

3 1 Fuller Street 

4 Court B, Curtis Ter. 
49 Spring Street 
48 Walker Street 
7 Carson Avenue 
77 River Street 

32 Chapman Street 
9 Chase Avenue 
178 Prospect Street 
745 East Street 



East Weymouth 
North Adams 
Chicopee 
Adams 

North Adams 
Clarksburg 
North Adams 
Greenfield 
North Adams 
North Adams 
Pittsfield 



ffiESHIMP 



Amato, Stephen B. 
Anton, Joseph F. 
Ayres, Mildred E. 
Bailey, Elizabeth A. 
Barry, Rosemary M. 
Bates, Eileen A. 
Beall, David M. 
Beauchamp, Bernard C. 
Bellows, Elvira M. 
Betti, Benjamin J. 
Boschetti, Joseph F. 
Bradley, Barbara E. 
Bullett, Donald J. 
Clarke, Allan T. 
Coty, Kathleen C. 
Cutler, Stuart M. 
Decensi, Peter 
Dennett, Francis 
Dolgoff, Alfred S. 
Dunn, Harold L., Jr. 
Dupuis, Norman W. 
Ellis, Frederick E. 
Glavin, James I. 
Gleason, Edward H. 
Goldberg, Paul H. 
Gomeau, Harold O. 
Grady, William F. 
Haley, Elmer Dunham 
Harrington, William R. 



30 Marietta Street 

1 3 Weber Street 

Box 214, Mt. View Ter. 
93 Warren Street 
306 Houghton Street 
100 North Street 
30 Williams Street 
5 3 Dover Street 

295 Houghton Street 
46 Williams Street 
154 Montague City Rd. 
17 Woodbine Avenue 
12 Ocean Green, S.W. 
395 Lebanon Avenue 
21 Elmwood Avenue 
9 Newark Street 

14 Arnold Street 
199 Houghton Street 
161 Ash Street 

83 First Street 
29 Devens Street 
Church Street 
Middle Road 
59 Summer Street 
35 Jackson Street 
99 Francis Avenue 
54 Holbrook Street 
29 High Street 



North Adams 

Adams 

Dalton 

Lynn 

North Adams 

North Adams 

North Adams 

North Adams 

Hawley 

North Adams 

North Adams 

Turners Falls 

Pittsfield 

Washington, D. C. 

Pittsfield 

North Adams 

Adams 

Williamstown 

North Adams 

West Bridgewater 

Pittsfield 

Greenfield 

Stockbridge 

Clarksburg 

Adams 

North Adams 

Pittsfield 

North Adams 

North Adams 



56 



Havreluk, Mary A. 
Higgins, Sally 
Houghton, Carl G. 
Hubbard, Bernard G. 
Jenkins, Carol J. 
Kirmil, Withold VitoJ. 
Koch, Barbara R. 
Langer, Paul W. 
Lee, Clarence J. 
Low, Eleanor M. 
Lucey, John C. 
MacDonald, Ralph A. 
MacHenry, Robert F. 
Martin, Frances A. 
McColgan, Mary E. 
Mellody, Lawrence C. 
Moody, Patricia A. 
Mottau, Albert J. 
Murray, Mark 
Murray, Ruth 
Nagle, Robert F. 
Nassif, Edward F. 
Nolan, Therese D. 
Olszowy, Edward 
O'Neil, Grace E. 
Ottman, Roger B. 
Pappas, Spero 
Pawlowski, Chester T. 
Porrovechio, Lois 
Prendergast, Patricia J. 
Prince, Norma V. 
Provencher, Mary E. T. 
Riordan, Theresa A. 
Ryan, John P., Jr. 
Seletsky, Janet R. 
Sokolosky, Edward A. 
Sparks, Mary F. 
Therrien, Valmore L. 
Tillbrook, Shirley V. 
Toporowski, Stanley A. 
Uchman, Casimer F. 
Whalen, Edward P. 
Wiyaczka, Darryl A. 
Wood, Edwin R. 



Main Street 

177 Chapman Street 

34 Brown Street 
Apple Valley Road 
205 East Street 
Adams Road 

5 5 Summer Street 
5 Wesleyan Street 
95 North Hancock St. 
371 Moraine Street 
18 Summit Avenue 
115 Franklin Street 
Housatonic Street 
626 Williams Street 
32 Madison Avenue 
42 Deering Street 
182 Dover Street 
37 Marietta Street 
37 Marietta Street 
106 Pleasant Street 
181 Houghton Street 
638 So. Ashland St. 
4 Richmond Street 
108 Cole Avenue 
329 Eagle Street 

2 1 Murray Street 

1 1 Traverse Street 

Main Street 

420 Eagle Street 

60 Bradley Street 

69 Main Street 

91 Hathaway Street 

73 Elm Street 

4 Alton Court 

Plain Road 

17 Pattison Avenue 

1 7 Taft Street 

637 King Street 

Wells Road 

1 Weber Street 

22 Spring Street 
91 Warren Street 

35 Yale Street 



Readsboro, Vermont 

Orleans 

Greenfield 

Pittsfield 

Ashfield 

Methuen 

Williamstown 

Adams 

North Adams 

Lexington 

Brockton 

North Adams 

Stoneham 

Lenox 

Pittsfield 

Pittsfield 

Reading 

Brockton 

North Adams 

North Adams 

North Adams 

North Adams 

North Adams 

Adams 

Williamstown 

North Adams 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Charlemont 

North Adams 

North Adams 

North Adams 

North Adams 

Pittsfield 

Brookline 

Greenfield 

North Adams 

North Adams 

Stratford, Conn. 

Cheshire 

Adams 

Adams 

Dalton 

North Adams 



57 



Crown Paint and Paper 

• 

ioi Main Street 


The Style Shoppe 

• 

96 Main Street 


Bateman's City Market 

• 

94 Main Street 


Pedercine's Diner 

• 

27 State Street 


COMPLETE NEWS COVERAGE 
— Local 

— National 

— International 


Full Associated Press Wire Service 


®lj? Nortlj Atoms Sranarrtpt 



58 



William M. Kirty, Jr. 


Dilego's Diner 


Architectural Designer 




ft 






Tel. 1412-M 




1036 Mass. Ave., North Adams, Mass. 


9 Ashland Street 


Best Wishes 




from 






Compliments of 


CidtuiXf'^ 




<§! 


Candyland 


North Adams 





59 



Select your cottons now 




The 


at 




CLKLINSAHC 


PlZZl s 




AND 


A 




D4PBy €€• 


Dresses featured in 




Inc. 


leading fashion magazines 




Established /Sjg 


Doris Dodson 






Nancy Hood 




■ 


Marie Phillips 




Hardware and Drug 


Pat Hart lev 






Tommie Austin 

Kay Dunhii.l 




Telephone 41 


Sprague Electric 


Company 










^SPRAGUEi 










NORTH ADAMS, MASS/* 


.CHUSETTS 



60 



A. B. C. Cleaners 


S. Patashnick 




Phone j6 






126 Columbia Street Adams 


[70 Ashland Street 




Complete Beauty Service 






Permanent* \ Specialty 






Emily's Beauty Salon 


KAY'S 




Mr. and Mrs. Edward Ci. Joseph 






Proprietors 


[33 F.agle Street 




2S Ashland Street Phone 20 1 






North Adams, Massachusetts 






• 


GtDRG€'S TIRE, RADIATOR 




W K O B 


AND BODY WORKS, INC. 




^ms 


23 2 Ashland Street North Adams 
Tel. 1404 




For A Balanced Program Fare 


Alto Glass 




860 On Your Dial 


Bear Wheel Alignment 





61 



V eiiice 


Grill 


NASSIFS 


• 

27 State Street 






Corner of Ashland and Summer Streets 


Wal 


QUHNM'S 

Ipapeir amid Paiiraft Store 

-•— 

55 UNION STREET 
NORTH ADAMS, MASSACHUSETTS 



62 



MOHAWK 


cosniin 


GIFT SHOP 






flectrical Store 


1 14 Main Street 






North Adams, Massachusetts 


• 
NORTHERN BERKSHIRE 


CHICK'S CAFE 


AUTOMOBILE DEALERS 




ASSOCIATION 


Adams, Mass. 


• 





63 





X^ ^ 




FISCHLEin S 

207 Ashland Street 




(TMION ER.Y (TORI 






108 Main Street North Adams 
Phone 1531 






Fort Massachusetts 




Less's Cash Market 

6 Marshall Street, North Adams, Mass. 




Good Food 




Historic Background 
All Legal Beverages 


Texaco Super Service 

Bert Faustini — Mgr. 
Tel. 1467 


Florini's Gardens 

American and Italian 
Specialty Cooking 

31-33 Holden Street North Adams 
Tel. 739 



64 



ADLAND'S 



WERS 



Olympian 

Bowling and Billiards 
ioi Main Street 

Tel. 469 



J. 



I 



Books 
Greeting Cards 

Stationery 

53 Main Street 
North Adams, Massachusetts 




eM 



1/Va 



e± 



to tie Class ?{ 



ig4g 



65